Summer Session 2017 Courses - Registration now open!

Courses subject to change without notice. Courses also appear in WesMaps. Courses may only be taken for credit; auditors are not permitted in Summer Session courses. All courses are 1 Wesleyan credit, with the exception of Chemistry 152 (Lab) which is worth .25 credit.

Click here for a PDF schedule of all Summer Session courses.

SUMMER SESSION I - MAY 31 - JUNE 29

ARST/CEAS460: Introduction to Sumi-e Painting Keiji Shinohara

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    3:30-5:10pm, Monday - Friday

    We will learn basic technique and composition of traditional Japanese sumi-e painting. Sumi-e is a style of black-and-white calligraphic ink painting that originated in China and eventually was introduced into Japan by Zen monks around 1333. We will concentrate on the four basic compositions of sumi-e: bamboo, chrysanthemum, orchid, and plum blossom. We will also study the works of the more famous schools, such as Kano. Students will create a portfolio of class exercises and their own creative pieces.

    Enrollment limit: 14

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    BOOKLIST: NONE

BIOL/MBB181: Principles of Biology I* Michelle Murolo

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    9:00-10:40am, Monday - Friday

    This course presents an exploration of the contemporary view of the cell and an introduction to the molecules and mechanisms of genetics and gene function. The course will have two major themes. First, we will focus on the central dogma of molecular biology, describing the process of information transfer from genetic code in DNA through protein synthesis and function. Topics include DNA replication and repair, chromosome dynamics, RNA transcription, protein translation, gene regulation, and genomics. Second, we will focus on cell theory and the underlying molecular mechanisms of cellular activity, including cell signaling, energetics, cell motility, and cell cycling. Lectures will stress the experimental basis of conclusions presented and highlight important details and major themes. The course will also emphasize problem solving approaches in cell and molecular biology.

    Enrollment Limit: 19

    *PreCollege students by permission of instructor only. Interested students should contact summer@wesleyan.edu for more information.

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    Essential Cell Biology, 4th edition, Alberts et al. ISBN-13: 978-0815345251

CHEM141: Introductory Chemistry I* Andrea Roberts

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    11:00am-12:40pm, Monday - Friday

    This course emphasizes rigorous descriptive reasoning. While intended for students with little or no previous background in chemistry, the course is taught at a relatively high level. The topical coverage emphasizes the relationships between electronic structure, chemical reactivity, and the physical properties of the elements and their compounds.

    CHEM152, the associated laboratory course, may be taken concurrently. CHEM152 will span over Summer Session I and II. 

    Enrollment Limit: 18

    *this course is not offered to PreCollege students.

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    Atkins and Jones, Chemical Principles: The Quest for Insight

CHEM152: Introductory Chemistry Laboratory* Andrea Roberts 
note: this lab will span over Session I and Session II
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    1:30-4:20pm, Tuesdays and Thursdays

    This course provides an introduction to the application of chemical concepts in the laboratory. The course will focus on practical aspects of fractional distillation, qualitative inorganic analysis, and synthesis of inorganic compounds. It should be taken by those who plan to take more than one year of chemistry.

    This course takes place over both Summer Sessions and is worth .25 credits total.

    Enrollment Limit: 18

    *this course is not offered to PreCollege students.

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    Students will need a lab notebook with carbon copy pages such as:
    Hayden McNeil, Chemistry Spiral Side 50-Set Lab Notebook, ISBN13: 9781429224550

    Students will also need to order a Lab Manual via the Course Packs link in their Portal.

ECON/CSPL127: Introduction to Financial Accounting Martin Gosman
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    1:30-3:10pm, Monday - Friday

    In this course, students learn how accountants define assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses and where those items are placed in firms' balance sheets and income statements. The purposes and limitations of these two financial statements as well as the statement of cash flows are considered. Students gain an understanding of the accounting numbers that appear in financial statements for inventories, depreciation, and leases; the choices given to firms in their reporting of those items; and how the use of different accounting methods for similar economic events creates challenges for analysts. Instances of questionable financial reporting and strategies that can aid in their discovery are addressed. Firms' filings of financial statements and note disclosures with the SEC are examined throughout the course.

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    Spiceland, Thomas, and Herrmann, Financial Accounting, 4th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2016. 

ENGL271: Distinguished Writers/New Voices (with Writers Conference) Anne Greene

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    9:00-10:40am, Monday - Friday

    The writing exercises in this course give students an introduction to nonfiction writing in several forms, both literary and journalistic. Talks by visiting writers in other genres--fiction, poetry, or drama--offer students a broader sense of writers' techniques and an introduction to interesting contemporary work. Students will attend lectures and readings by the visiting writers, meet in classes and workshop sessions, and work on short writing assignments.

    Enrollment Limit: 15

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    A binder of essays, profiles, and journalistic pieces selected for the class.

    The following books:

    Kimmelman         THE ACCIDENTAL MASTERPIECE

    Didion                  SLOUCHING TOWARDS BETHLEHEM

    Atwan, Levy         BEST AMERICAN ESSAYS 2015

    Mukherjee   BEST AMERICAN SCIENCE & NATURE WRITING 2013

    Furman                 O. HENRY PRIZE STORIES 2008

    Treisman     20 UNDER 40: STORIES FROM THE NEW YORKER

    Gornick                FIERCE ATTACHMENTS

    Lopate                  ART OF THE PERSONAL ESSAY

    Hughes                 BEST FOOD WRITING 2013 

HIST294: Political Fiction Cecilia Miller

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    11:00am-12:40pm, Monday - Friday

    Attitudes toward politics, economics, society, and history will be examined from works of fiction that directly criticize an existing society or that present an alternative, sometimes fantastic, reality.

    Enrollment Limit: 18

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    BOOKLIST:

    • Cervantes, Don Quixote (Penguin)
    • Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (Penguin)
    • Voltaire, Candide (Penguin)
    • (May add books later)

CANCELED - MUSC108: History of Rock and R&B Eric Charry

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    This course has been canceled. The following information is provided for reference only.

    7:00-9:10pm, Monday - Thursday

    This course will survey the history of rock and R&B (broadly defined as a conglomeration of loosely connected popular musical genres) from their origins in the 1940s and '50s through the early 1990s. Three parallel goals will be pursued: to become literate in the full range of their constituent traditions; to experience the workings of the music industry by producing group projects; and to become familiar with a variety of theoretical approaches to the music, confronting issues such as economics of the industry, race relations and identities, youth culture and its relationship to American popular culture, and popular music as a creative, cultural, and social force. For the midterm and final projects, the class will form a music industry in microcosm, producing audio and video recordings and a magazine. 

    Click here to download the syllabus for this course.

    (Note: MUSC108 will not be offered during the 2017-18 regular academic year)

    Enrollment Limit: TBD

QAC201/SOCS257/GOVT201/PSYC280/NSB280: Applied Data Analysis Jennifer Cooper

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    1:30-3:10pm, Monday - Friday

    In this project-based course, you will have the opportunity to answer questions that you feel passionately about through independent research based on existing data. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills in generating testable hypotheses, conducting a literature review, preparing data for analysis, conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, and presenting research findings. The course offers one-on-one support, ample opportunities to work with other students, and training in the skills required to complete a project of your own design. These skills will prepare you to work in many different research labs across the University that collect empirical data. It is also an opportunity to fulfill an important requirement in several different majors.

    Enrollment Limit: 19

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    BOOKLIST: NONE

SESSION II - JULY 6 - AUGUST 2, 2017

AMST245/ENGL246 Personalizing History Indira Karamcheti

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    11:00am-12:40pm, Monday - Friday

    How much are we shaped by our historical times and places? How much power do we have to make our historical conditions respond to our needs and desires? These questions and others are at the foundation of our class, which includes both memoir writing and memoir reading. We will construct narratives about our times and selves in a series of writing workshops. There will be some exercises where you will be asked to research specific aspects of your times and places. For example, you might be asked to research and write about such questions as when and where were you born, what were the major cultural or political currents of that time, and how was your early childhood influenced by them? Or you may be asked to bring in a photograph of someone important in your personal history and write about that person. 

    The memoir is a distinct genre, with topics/themes particular to it. Some of the most important are memory itself, childhood, place and displacement, language, loss/trauma/melancholia/nostalgia, self-invention or transformation, family and generational differences. The class will engage with these topics in the analysis of the readings and also in the writing of memoirs. Specific techniques will be highlighted for writing practice: the catalog, diction, dialogue, metaphor, description, point of view, and narrative structure, including temporal organization, the doubled narrative, and the narrative frame.

    Enrollment Limit: 12

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    TBA

BIOL/MBB182: Principles of Biology II* Kathleen Miller

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    9:00-10:40am, Monday - Friday

    This course concerns biological principles as they apply primarily at tissue, organismic, and population levels of organization. Course topics include developmental biology, animal physiology and homeostatic control systems, endocrinology, neurophysiology and the neuronal basis of behavior. Evidence for evolution is reviewed, as are the tenets of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection. The nature and importance of variation among organisms and of stochastic processes in evolution are discussed, as are modern theories of speciation and macroevolution. Finally, the course addresses interactions between organisms and their environments as well as the interactions among organisms in natural communities. Each of the topics of the course is explored from a comparative viewpoint to recognize common principles as well as variations among organisms that indicate evolutionary adaptation to different environments and niches.

    Enrollment Limit: 19

    *PreCollege students by permission of instructor only. Interested students should contact summer@wesleyan.edu for more information.

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    TBA

CHEM142: Introductory Chemistry II* Andrea Roberts

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    11:00am-12:40pm, Monday - Friday

    This course is a continuation of CHEM141. The lab should be taken by those who plan to take more than one year of chemistry.

    CHEM152, the associated laboratory course, may be taken concurrently. CHEM152 will span over Summer Session I and II. 

    *this course is not offered to PreCollege students.

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    Atkins and Jones, Chemical Principles: The Quest for Insight

CHEM152: Introductory Chemistry Laboratory* Andrea Roberts 
note: this lab will span over Session I and Session II
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    1:30-4:20pm, Tuesday and Thursday

    This course provides an introduction to the application of chemical concepts in the laboratory. The course will focus on practical aspects of fractional distillation, qualitative inorganic analysis, and synthesis of inorganic compounds. It should be taken by those who plan to take more than one year of chemistry.

    *this course is not offered to PreCollege students.

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    TBA

ENGL220: The Armchair Adventurer: Popular and Literary Fiction at the Turn of the Twentieth Century Stephanie Weiner

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    1:30-3:10pm, Monday - Friday

    At the turn of the twentieth century, stories of travel, action, and adventure enjoyed enormous market success and cultural prominence. This course examines the interaction between the adventure stories told in popular genre fiction--science fiction, historical fiction, adventure stories, detective novels, romance, children's literature, etc.--and their 'high' literary cousins. In the first half of the course, we will read classic works of genre fiction in order to understand the appeal of these stories and storytelling modes, for both writers and readers, and to identify their generic structures, plots, and premises. In the second half of the course, we will turn to four works of literary fiction that emerged in a close conversation with these popular forms.

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    BOOKLIST:

    • H. G. Wells The Time Machine Penguin Classics 978-0141439976
    • Joseph Conrad Lord Jim Oxford World's Classics 978-0199536023
    • Rudyard Kipling Kim Oxford World's Classics 978-0-19-953646-7
    • Arthur Conan Doyle A Study in Scarlet Oxford World's Classics 978-0199554775
    • E.M. Forster A Room with a View Penguin Classics 978-0141183299
    • Haggard King Solomon's Mines Oxford World's Classics  978-0199536412
    • Stevenson Kidnapped Penguin 978-0141441795
    • Barrie Peter Pan Penguin 978-0142437933
    • James The Ambassadors Oxford World's Classics 978-0199538546
    • P. G. Wodehouse Picadilly Jim Overlook Hardcover 978-1585676163

ENGL259: The Art of the Personal Essay Elizabeth Bobrick

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    9:00-10:40am, Monday - Friday

    The personal essay is short-form, first-person, narrative nonfiction that encompasses many genres: memoir, reflection, humor, familial and social history, and cultural criticism. Yet even these boundaries often blur within a single essay, and the personal essay can expand to include almost any topic. Writing personal essays--what author and critic Philip Lopate calls "the self-interrogative genre"--helps us find out what we think, often makes us change our minds, and, ideally, leads us to new insights. In class, we will discuss the assigned readings, participate in group responses to each others' writing (workshops), and write in response to prompts. We will study both traditional and unconventional techniques of nonfiction, focusing on the elements of craft: structure, voice, clarity, the use of descriptive detail, and revision.

    Enrollment Limit: 18

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    BOOKLIST: NONE – course packet (printed on campus)

FULLY ENROLLED - FILM458: Visual Storytelling: Screenwriting Steve Collins

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    1:30-3:10pm, Monday - Friday

    Since watching movies (good ones) is so easy and pleasurable, screenwriting is a medium that everyone's uncle thinks they can do. But anyone who has had to read an amateur screenplay knows different. This is a writing course that will start from ground zero: separating the screenplay from other forms, e.g., the play and the novel, and grounding students in visual language as the basis of the medium. How do we write in pictures?

    Enrollment Limit: 18

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    BOOKLIST: NONE

 CANCELED - FIST/CGST230 Between Marx and Coca Cola - European Cinema of the 60s and 70s Ulrich Bach

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    This Course has been canceled. The following information is provided for reference only.

    11:00am-12:40pm, Monday - Friday

    Click here to open the syllabus for this course.

    In the 1960s and early 1970s, a growing sense of alienation and social unrest spread across Europe, making their marks in both society and cinema. Borrowing the words of New Wave director Jean-Luc Godard, these years led to the emergence of "the children of Marx and Coca-Cola." This course, taught in English, will introduce students to a multi-faceted portrait of Europe in the 1960s and 70s through avant-garde and popular cinema from France, Italy, Spain, Germany, and Eastern Europe. We will focus on films that depict global capitalism, gender relations, and government control. Some of the themes we will discuss include the critique of consumerism and materialism, the changing role of women in society, life under socialism and dictatorship, and youth counterculture. Last but not least, students will learn how New Wave directors challenged traditional approaches to narrative cinema.

GOVT155: International Politics Giulio Gallarotti

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    3:30-5:10pm, Monday - Friday

    This introduction to international politics applies various theories of state behavior to selected historical cases. Topics include the balance of power, change in international systems, the causes of war and peace, and the role of international law, institutions, and morality in the relations among nations.

    Enrollment Limit: 19

    READINGS/BOOKLIST Subject to change

    BOOKLIST: All in paper. Used copies OK

    • Robert Art and Robert Jervis, Eds., International Politics,  13th Edition
    • Bruce Russett, Harvey Starr, and David Kinsella,  World Politics, 10th Edition
    • Giulio Gallarotti,  The Power Curse
    • Giulio Gallarotti, Cosmopolitan Power in International Relations
    • Robert Kennedy, Thirteen Days

Canceled: 

HIST272: Law, Court and Crime in England, 600-1660 A.D. Gary Shaw