Summer Session 2018 Courses 

Courses subject to change without notice. Courses will also appear in WesMaps. Courses may only be taken for credit; auditors are not permitted in Summer Session courses. All courses are 1 Wesleyan credit, with the exception of Chemistry 152 (Lab) which is worth .25 credit.

Click here to download a complete PDF of the 2018 Course Schedule.

SUMMER SESSION I: MAY 30 - JUNE 28

DIVISION I - Arts and Humanities

ENGL205/THEA210: Shakespeare Sam Fallon

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    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 7:00pm - 9:10pm
    Location: Fisk Hall 121

    This course is an introduction to the drama of William Shakespeare. We will read plays representing the major dramatic genres--comedy, history, and tragedy--and study them in the context of the historical transformations that shaped early modern England, from the Protestant Reformation to New World colonization. Our guiding focus will be on drama as a form of skepticism. How, we will ask, do Shakespeare's plays force us to question the legitimacy of political rule, the categories of race and gender, and the nature of the self? How do they imagine the challenge of knowing, trusting, and loving others? And how do they wrestle with the dangers of doubting too much?

CANCELLED - ENGL271: Distinguished Writers/New Voices (with Writer's Conference) Anne Greene

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    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 9:00am - 10:40am
    Location: Downey 100

    The writing exercises in this course give students an introduction to nonfiction writing in several forms, both literary and journalistic. Talks by visiting writers in other genres--fiction, poetry, or drama--offer students a broader sense of writers' techniques and an introduction to interesting contemporary work. Students will attend lectures and readings by the visiting writers, meet in classes and workshop sessions, and work on short writing assignments.

    During the Wesleyan Writers Conference (June 13-17), students in ENGL271 may attend classes, talks, and events, and discuss their own writing, with members of the Conference faculty-- fiction writers, poets, nonfiction writers, and journalists. Some students may also want to work as Conference staff. This staff job is a chance to get to know many writers, from across the US and abroad, in an informal setting. 

DIVISION II - Social and Behavioral Sciences

CANCELLED - GOVT311: US Foreign Policy Douglas Foyle
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS GOVT
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 9:00am - 10:40am
    Location: Public Affairs Center 422 

    This course provides a survey of the content and formulation of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the period after World War II.  It evaluates the sources of American foreign policy including the international system, societal factors, government processes, and individual decision makers.  The course begins with a consideration of major trends in U.S. foreign policy after World War II. With a historical base established, the focus turns to the major institutions and actors in American foreign policy. The course concludes with an examination of the challenges and opportunities that face current U.S. decision makers. A significant component of the course is the intensive discussion of specific foreign policy decisions.

    No prior knowledge of U.S. foreign policy or international politics is assumed other than what might be gathered from keeping up with the current events.

CANCELLED - ECON127/CSPL127: Introduction to Financial Accounting Martin Gosman
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS ECON
    Prerequisites: ECON101 or ECON110
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 1:30pm - 3:10pm
    Location: Science Tower 141 

    In this course, students learn how accountants define assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses and where those items are placed in firms' balance sheets and income statements. The purposes and limitations of these two financial statements as well as the statement of cash flows are considered. Students gain an understanding of the accounting numbers that appear in financial statements for inventories, depreciation, and leases; the choices given to firms in their reporting of those items; and how the use of different accounting methods for similar economic events creates challenges for analysts. Instances of questionable financial reporting and strategies that can aid in their discovery are addressed. Firms' filings of financial statements and note disclosures with the SEC are examined throughout the course.

DIVISION III - Natural Sciences and Mathematics

COMP112: Introduction to Programming (with Python) Jim Lipton
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM MATH
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Student Option
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm
    Location: Art Workshop 112 

    In this course students will be introduced to programming, using the Python language, from scratch. No background at all is required. Students will acquire basic coding skills that will enable them to continue with more advanced programming courses, or to learn about more advanced applications in many fields. This would include data analysis applications or coding web and phone apps and games. In this course we will cover basic program construction techniques including the use of function definitions loops and classes. We will work towards a final graphical game project using a popular graphical user interface called TkInter. Students may propose alternative graphical project ideas. The choice of programming language, Python, is based on a number of considerations: it is one of the most widely used languages in the world today. Many resources (additional packages) are available for Python for web development, machine learning, data science, graphics, map and GPS applications, games, interfaces to Google, Facebook and Twitter. This is a "hands-on" course: students will spend close to half of class time writing or completing programs in class, with the instructor giving assistance and making comments one-on-one. There is no better way to learn how to code than by doing it.

CANCELLED - E&ES199: Introduction to Environmental Science and Sustainability Suzanne O'Connell
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: TBA
    Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm; Wednesday field trips, 1:30-4:50pm
    Location:Science Tower 405 

    Earth's natural systems have operated for billions of years but are now severely altered by human activity. The rate of environmental change caused by humans is unprecedented. This course is designed to help students explore the science behind four interrelated environmental areas; water, energy, food and climate change. We will explore some of the basic principles of atmospheric science, ecology, environmental chemistry, geosciences, and hydrology.

BIOL/MB&B181: Principles of Biology I Sarah Kopac
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM MB&B
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: TBA
    Schedule: Monday-Friday. 9:00am-10:40am
    Location: Science Tower 141

    This course presents an exploration of the contemporary view of the cell and an introduction to the molecules and mechanisms of genetics and gene function. The course will have two major themes. First, we will focus on the central dogma of molecular biology, describing the process of information transfer from genetic code in DNA through protein synthesis and function. Topics include DNA replication and repair, chromosome dynamics, RNA transcription, protein translation, gene regulation, and genomics. Second, we will focus on cell theory and the underlying molecular mechanisms of cellular activity, including cell signaling, energetics, cell motility, and cell cycling. Lectures will stress the experimental basis of conclusions presented and highlight important details and major themes. The course will also emphasize problem solving approaches in cell and molecular biology.

CHEM141: Introductory Chemistry* Anthony Davis

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    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CHEM
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 11:00am - 12:40pm
    Location: Shanklin 201

    This course emphasizes rigorous descriptive reasoning. While intended for students with little or no previous background in chemistry, the course is taught at a relatively high level. The topical coverage emphasizes the relationships between electronic structure, chemical reactivity, and the physical properties of the elements and their compounds.

    CHEM152, the associated laboratory course, may be taken concurrently. CHEM152 will span over Summer Session I and II. 

    *this course is not offered to PreCollege students.

CHEM152: Introductory Chemistry Laboratory* Andrea Roberts 
note: this lab will span over Session I and Session II
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CHEM
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Tuesday, Thursday, 1:30pm - 4:20pm
    Location: Hall Atwater 80

    This course provides an introduction to the application of chemical concepts in the laboratory. The course will focus on practical aspects of fractional distillation, qualitative inorganic analysis, and synthesis of inorganic compounds. It should be taken by those who plan to take more than one year of chemistry.

    This course takes place over both Summer Sessions and is worth .25 credits total.

    *this course is not offered to PreCollege students.

PSYC105: Foundations of Contemporary Psychology Steven Stemler
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS PSYC
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Student Option
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 11:00am - 12:40pm
    Location: Fisk Hall 121

    This course will include an introductory-level presentation of ideas and research findings in the major areas of psychology. It will serve as both preparation for upper-level courses in psychology and as a valuable contribution to students' liberal arts education. This course will help students discover what psychology is and what psychologists do. Not only will students learn the basic content of psychology, but the course should help them to think critically about such everyday issues as, In what ways are we like other humans, and how do we differ? What do babies perceive and think? Why do we dream? Content areas include history of psychology, methods of psychological research, biological basis of human behavior, motivation and emotions, learning and memory, sensation and perception, cognitive and social development, personality, intelligence, and psychopathology.

SUMMER SESSION II: JULY 2 - AUGUST 1, 2018

DIVISION I - Arts and Humanities

ARST190: Digital Art Christopher Chenier

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    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ART
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 11:00am - 12:40pm
    Location: Digital Design Studio

    This experience will introduce students to the digital arts, an area of creative practice encompassing computer-based art from GIFS and graphics to cutting edge digital fabrication tools. While developing the critical and methodological tools to engage problems in our digital culture, students will acquire the practical skills necessary to create and communicate digitally. Sessions will emphasize the ways software is used for project development, prototyping, and experimentation. Most of our time will be spend in Adobe Creative Cloud. The core elements of CC will be covered through workshops in image editing, graphics, layout, and type. Translating digital files into physical objects, students will work with a laser cutter, large format inket printers, and a CNC mill.

CANCELLED - ENGL370: The Graphic Novel William Eggers

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    Gen Ed Area Dept: ARHA
    Prerequisites:
    None
    Grading Mode:
    TBA
    Schedule:
    Monday-Friday, 1:30pm - 3:10pm
    Location: Fisk Hall 121

    Since the ground-breaking publication of Art Spiegelman's Maus in 1993, "graphic novels" have entered the global cultural mainstream. A truly multicultural genre, comics created by men and women around the world now appear in U.S. high school and college curricula, hold the attention of academic critics, and earn big box-office returns in cinematic adaptations. Though dubbed "graphic novels" by publishers to signal their high-culture aspirations and achievement, outstanding examples of the contemporary book-length comic actually appear in many literary genres. In this course we will survey the current field and read works of fiction (such as THE WATCHMEN), autobiography (MAUS, PERSEPOLIS, FUN HOME), journalism (SAFE AREA GORAZDE), and what we might call "comic theory" (UNDERSTANDING COMICS). And just as comics have become a global medium, they are perhaps inherently "postmodern." Many contemporary comics are self-conscious about questions of form and theories of representation, a characteristic that will help us formulate new versions of the questions often considered in literary study. How do words and pictures drawn together in sequential narratives tell stories? What different skills are needed to comprehend this complex play of image, language, and time? What can graphic books do that other books cannot, and what are the constraints that shape this form? 

    Do not feel limited by any thematic suggestions I may have for this course.  The richness of this material and the depth to which these tales have embedded themselves in our collective psyche may well inspire responses that surprise you.  Clearly, an important theme in the class will be an exploration about attitudes toward the past.  How does nostalgia inform our responses to these and other tales?  How do we define ourselves in relation to this past – do we seek to embrace it or “other” it?  Do these ideals echo deep-seated psychological needs or are they cultural constructions serving other purposes?

    Looking closely at these works will remind us that that every speech-act teaches values, directly or indirectly.  Literature, because of its rich emotional and intellectual qualities, does a particularly good job of reinforcing or changing readers’ values without seeming to do so.  Even works whose authors had no specific agenda in mind convey values. When reading, keep in mind the idea that the “truth” is an elastic social construct.  Every written document attempts to define or re-define this truth.  By observing how these tales argue for a “truth,” we will learn how they are attempting to change the world by changing the way a reader sees the world.  

    Required Texts:

    McCloud, Scott.  Understanding Comics.
    O’Malley, Brian Lee.  Scott Pilgrim 1.
    Satrapi, Marjane.  Persepolis.
    Nye, Naomi Shabib.  Habibi.
    Moore, Alan.  Watchmen.
    Speigelman, Art.  The Complete Maus.
    Mazzuchelli, David.  Asterios Polyp.
    Sousani, Nick.  Unflattening.
    Cruse, Howard.  Stuck Rubber Baby,
    Bechdel, Alison.  Fun Home.
    Tan, Shaun.  The Arrival.
    Lewis, John. March:  Book 1
    Ma, Gabriel and Fabio Moon.  Day Tripper.
    In addition, I will be giving you a variety of handouts over the term (often on Moodle).

ENGL296: Techniques of Fiction Lisa Locascio
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Prerequisites: None 
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 11:00am - 12:40pm
    Location: Boger Hall 113

    This introduction to the elements of fiction and a range of authors is for students who want to write and, through writing, increase their understanding and appreciation of a variety of short stories.

CANCELLED - DANC107: Writing is Dancing, Dancing is Writing Abigail Levine
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA DANC
    Prerequisites: None 
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: Click here
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 3:30pm - 5:10pm
    Location: Schoenberg Dance Studio

    “The interpreter, without actually erasing or rewriting the text, is altering it. But he can't admit it. He claims only to be making it intelligible..."  (Susan Sontag)

    We watch dance and then we write about it. Dance needs writing to be understood and to endure. Or maybe not. Maybe dance needs no help. Then, what do we write? Writing as dance, in dance, of, from, alongside... As readers, writers, and performers, we will explore established and experimental modes of writing and choreography and look for ways that each form can stretch and challenge the other.

    This is a hybrid creative-critical course. It will introduce major themes and questions surrounding the interaction of writing and dance, look at contemporary artworks and texts that illuminate the breadth of engagement between the two forms, and experiment with dance and writing as complementary creative and critical modes. All classes will include a movement component. Prior dance experience is not required, but a willingness to move and experiment with unfamiliar material is essential.

    Examinations and Assignments: Ongoing readings, video/ live performance viewing, written reflections, and compositional assignments; three short papers; culminating creative project. Be prepared each class to respond to readings, viewing, and movement assignments. Everyone will be expected to contribute to discussion in every class. Please also wear clothes comfortable to move in.

FILM458: Visual Storytelling: Screenwriting Mirko Rucnov 
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA FILM
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 9:00am - 10:40am
    Location: Center for Film Studies 124

    Since watching movies (good ones) is so easy and pleasurable, screenwriting is a medium that everyone's uncle thinks they can do. But anyone who has had to read an amateur screenplay knows different. This is a writing course that will start from ground zero: separating the screenplay from other forms, e.g., the play and the novel, and grounding students in visual language as the basis of the medium. How do we write in pictures?

ENGL259: The Art of the Personal Essay Meg Weisberg 
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 9:00am - 10:40am
    Location: Shapiro Center for Writing 102

    The personal essay is short-form, first-person, narrative nonfiction that encompasses many genres: memoir, reflection, humor, familial and social history, and cultural criticism. Yet even these boundaries often blur within a single essay, and the personal essay can expand to include almost any topic. Writing personal essays--what author and critic Philip Lopate calls "the self-interrogative genre"--helps us find out what we think, often makes us change our minds, and, ideally, leads us to new insights. In class, we will discuss the assigned readings, participate in group responses to each others' writing (workshops), and write in response to prompts. We will study both traditional and unconventional techniques of nonfiction, focusing on the elements of craft: structure, voice, clarity, the use of descriptive detail, and revision.

DIVISION II - Social and Behavioral Sciences

GOVT155: International Politics Giulio Gallarotti 
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS GOVT
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 3:30pm - 5:10pm
    Location: Public Affairs Center 422

    This introduction to international politics applies various theories of state behavior to selected historical cases. Topics include the balance of power, change in international systems, the causes of war and peace, and the role of international law, institutions, and morality in the relations among nations.

DIVISION III - Natural Sciences and Mathematics

CANCELLED - CIS/WRCT150: The Science Behind Popular Scientific Literature John Cooley 
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CIS
    Certifications: Writing
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 1:30-3:10
    Location: Science Center 189

    This course focuses on academic STEM writing and is an exploration of the scientific literature in the reference list of Elizabeth Kolbert's "The Sixth Extinction." Assignments will consist of numerous low-stakes writing prompts with extensive peer and instructor feedback, and a term project paper constructed along the lines of a STEM review paper. This course fulfills a key need in developing science literacy and teaching students how to find and use reliable sources to critically evaluate popular science writing.

CANCELLED - BIOL155/MB&B155: Tiny Organisms with a Big Effect: The Microbiome Sarah Kopac 
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM BIOL
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 7:00pm - 8:40pm
    Location: Science Tower 141

    With the advent of advanced sequencing technology, we are able to characterize the microflora that lives on and inside of multicellular organisms, including humans. It follows that there are still many unknowns with respect to the function and dynamics of relationships between bacterial communities and their hosts. These bacterial communities, colonizing humans and other organisms with millions of microbes, has captured the interest of the public. Popular news outlets have made the disparate claims that the right human microbiome can act as a panacea and the wrong microbiome is such a calamity that it can destroy an individual’s health. This course will look at the true nature of the microbiome, to the extent that current research has revealed. We will discuss both normal and abnormal bacterial community compositions and any related disease states. Similarly, we will cover changes in microbiome composition over time and with respect to host development. In class we will also consider the microbiomes of other organisms and how the presence and composition of the microbiome relates to disease states and/or life history.

CHEM142: Introductory Chemistry II* Andrea Roberts 
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CHEM
    Prerequisites: CHEM141
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 11:00am - 12:40pm
    Location: Shanklin 201

    This course is a continuation of CHEM141. This course emphasizes rigorous descriptive reasoning. While intended for students with little or no previous background in chemistry, the course is taught at a relatively high level. The topical coverage emphasizes the relationships between electronic structure, chemical reactivity, and the physical properties of the elements and their compounds.

    CHEM152, the associated laboratory course, may be taken concurrently. CHEM152 will span over Summer Session I and II. 

    *this course is not offered to PreCollege students.

CHEM152: Introductory Chemistry Laboratory* Andrea Roberts 
note: this lab will span over Session I and Session II
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM Chem
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Tuesday, Thursday, 1:30pm - 4:20pm
    Location: Hall Atwater 80

    This course provides an introduction to the application of chemical concepts in the laboratory. The course will focus on practical aspects of fractional distillation, qualitative inorganic analysis, and synthesis of inorganic compounds. It should be taken by those who plan to take more than one year of chemistry.

    *this course is not offered to PreCollege students.

PSYC291: Language and Thought Anna Shusterman
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    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 11:00am - 12:40pm
    Location: Fisk Hall 210

    This course provides a close examination on the relationship between language and thought, a central question in cognitive science and a very active area of research and theory in recent years. Students will be exposed to theoretical and empirical work evaluating several prominent hypotheses about language and thought, including the hypothesis that the language you speak influences or even determines the thoughts you can think. The case studies to be evaluated will include object kinds, number, spatial relations, time, gender, theory of mind, and causality. This is an elective course towards the psychology major.

    Major Readings:
    Students will read primary source readings from empirical journals and selected review papers in books or journals. Readings will draw on empirical studies in psychology with a particular emphasis on cross-linguistic and cross-cultural studies. The theoretical foundation will draw from psychology as well as philosophy, linguistics, cognitive science, neuroscience, and anthropology. Authors to be read include Barner, Boroditsky, Carey, Carruthers, Clark, Fodor, Gleitman, Gordon, Jackendoff, Landau, Laurence, Locke, Margolis, Pinker, Slobin, Spelke, and Whorf.

    Examination and Assignments:
    6 one-page response papers; short quizzes; final essay; and discussion.