The Office of Graduate Student Services will be closed Monday, July 3rd and Tuesday, July 4th.  In addition, the office will close at noon on the following Fridays: June 30, July 7, July 14, July 21 and August 4, 2017. 

Graduate Community Standards Board

Upon arrival on campus, graduate students sign an agreement via their electronic portal to abide by Wesleyan’s Honor Code and Code of Non-Academic Conduct. The Graduate Community Standards Board (GCSB) is responsible for adjudicating alleged violations of these codes by a Wesleyan graduate student. The GCSB is comprised of seven graduate students, and is overseen and advised by one faculty member of the Graduate Council, the Director of Graduate Studies and the Director of Graduate Student Services.

Mission Statement

As an essential element of student governance, the Graduate Community Standards Board exists to uphold the standards of the Wesleyan Community by providing equitable and unbiased peer adjudication of alleged student violations of the Honor Code and the Code of Non-Academic Conduct. The Board seeks to respond constructively, fairly, and effectively to alleged violations. In order to do so, the Board makes every effort to respond to all cases in a timely manner, to ensure that all students are aware of their rights within the judicial process, and to protect those rights. The Board strives to deal with cases in a manner that is conducive to a student’s personal growth and accountability to the Wesleyan Community.

Regulations and Process

  • Honor Code

    In an academic community, learning and evaluation require explicit and shared agreements on intellectual honesty and academic integrity.  At Wesleyan, these values and the standards of academic conduct they imply constitute the Honor Code, the affirmation of which is a condition of enrollment.  Adjudication of alleged violations of the honor code issue from an Honor Board, comprised of students.  The board ensures consistent interpretation and sanctions for violations while serving as a constant reminder of communal principles.  Violations against the code are violations against the community, the ultimate source of the principles articulated below.  Accordingly, upon witnessing or otherwise becoming aware of an apparent violation, members of the community have an obligation to report the violation or to discuss it with the appropriate faculty member, a member of the Honor Board, or the Vice President for Student Affairs.

    • A. The Pledge

    The pledge is an affirmation of each student's agreement to adhere to the standards of academic integrity set by Wesleyan's Honor Code.  In order to promote constant awareness of the Honor Code, faculty are encouraged to ask students to sign the pledge when submitting any academic exercise for evaluation.  The pledges read as follows:

    For papers and similar written work:
    In accordance with the Honor Code, I affirm that this work is my own and all content taken from other sources has been properly acknowledged.

    For tests and other academic exercises:
    In accordance with the Honor Code, I affirm that this work has been completed without improper assistance.

    B. Violations of the Honor Code

    1. The attempt to give or obtain assistance in a formal academic exercise without due acknowledgement.  This includes, but is not limited to: cheating during an exam; helping another student to cheat or to plagiarize; completing a project for someone and/or asking someone to complete a project for you.

    2. Plagiarism - the presentation of another person's words, ideas, images, data or research as one's own.  Plagiarism is more than lifting a text word-for-word, even from sources in the public domain.  Paraphrasing or using any content or terms coined by others without proper acknowledgement also constitutes plagiarism.

    3. The submission of the same work for academic credit more than once without permission.

    4. Willful falsification of data, information, or citations in any formal exercise.

    5. Deception concerning adherence to the conditions set by the instructor for a formal academic exercise.

  • Code of Non-Academic Conduct

    I. INTRODUCTION

    The Code of Non-Academic Conduct was written in light of the following passage excerpted from the Joint Statement on the Rights and Freedoms of Students.

    “The institution has an obligation to clarify those standards of behavior that it considers essential to its educational mission and its community life. These general behavioral expectations and the resultant specific regulations should represent a reasonable regulation of student conduct, but the student should be as free as possible from imposed limitations that have no direct relevance to his/her education. Offenses should be as clearly defined as possible and interpreted in a manner consistent with the aforementioned principles of relevancy and reasonableness. Disciplinary proceedings should be instituted only for violations of standards of conduct formulated with significant student participation and published in advance through such means as a Student Handbook or a generally available body of institutional regulations.”

    Obviously, no code could anticipate every form of conduct detrimental to the University. Each member of the University community, therefore, is expected to pay close attention to the Joint Statement on the Rights and Freedoms of Students and to remember that a reasonable, considerate, and courteous attitude toward all others in the community is the primary goal and the best guideline.

    It should be remembered that Wesleyan also has an obligation to uphold the laws of the larger community of which it is a part. While the activities covered by the laws of the larger community and those covered by Wesleyan’s rules may overlap, it is important to note that the community’s laws and Wesleyan’s rules operate independently and that they do not substitute for each other. Wesleyan may pursue enforcement of its own rules whether or not legal proceedings are under way or in prospect and may use information from third-party sources, such as law enforcement agencies and the courts, to determine whether University rules have been broken. Conversely, the University makes no attempt to shield members of the Wesleyan community from the law, nor does it intervene in legal proceedings against a member of the community. Membership in the Wesleyan community does not exempt anyone from local, state, or federal laws, but rather imposes the additional obligation to abide by all of Wesleyan’s regulations.

    As a point of information, it should be mentioned that all members of the University community are expected to adhere to the regulations while on campus or engaged in University activities.

    REGULATIONS

     1.     DISTURBANCE OF THE PEACE—The infringement upon the right to privacy of any member of the community is prohibited. Disorderly and disruptive conduct and/or the persistent disturbance of  a reasonable level of  peace and quiet is also a violation. Students should be aware that repeated violation of this regulation could result in administrative reassignment to another residential unit or area.

    2.     HARASSMENT AND ABUSE—Harassment and abuse, directed toward individuals or groups, may include at least the following forms: the use or threat of physical violence, coercion, intimidation, and verbal harassment and abuse. Wesleyan University’s commitment to nondiscrimination means that intentional discriminatory harassment may be punished more severely than nondiscriminatory or unintentional forms of harassment.

    3.     DISCRIMINATORY HARASSMENT AND SEXUAL MISCONDUCT—Sexual misconduct, including, but not limited to, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, stalking and retaliation, is prohibited. (See University Policies—Discriminatory Harassment and Sexual Misconduct)

    4.     PROPERTY—The unauthorized use, or the abuse, destruction, or theft of university property or the property of  any of its members, guests, or neighbors is prohibited. This includes but is not limited to all tunnels, roofs, and areas under construction. This regulation prohibits the unauthorized appropriation or “borrowing” of common property for personal use.

    5.     FALSE INFORMATION—Knowingly furnishing false information to a university officer or member of any constituted hearing board acting in performance of his/her duties is prohibited.

    6.     MISUSE OF DOCUMENTS—Forgery, alteration, or the unauthorized possession or use of university documents, records or instruments of identification is prohibited.

    7.     TAMPERING WITH LOCKS AND DUPLICATION OF KEYS—Tampering with locks in university buildings, unauthorized possession or use of university keys, and alteration or unauthorized duplication of university keys are prohibited.

    8.     FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS— Tampering with fire extinguishers, fire alarm boxes, or smoke or heat detectors any- where on university property is prohibited. Additional information about fire safety procedures may be found at wesleyan.edu/firesafety.

    9.     RESTRICTED ITEMS/FIRE HAZARDS—The following are considered fire hazards and are prohibited within any university-owned or -operated facility:

     

          A.    Starting a fire anywhere on university property without explicit permission from the Office of Public Safety is prohibited.         

                B.    The use or storage of kerosene lamps, canned heat (®Sterno), flammable liquids, charcoal grills, and other open-flame devices, except in areas such as kitchens or laboratories that are specifically designed for their use. Likewise, candles and flammable decorations are also prohibited.

                C.    STUDENT RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES—Cooking/heating devices are prohibited in all student residential facilities (except kitchens). Certain decorative items (such as candles, halogen lamps, tapestries, etc.) are also prohibited in student residences. A detailed listing of items not allowed in student residences is provided in the “Terms and Conditions” of the housing contract.

                D.    EXPLOSIVES, AMMUNITION, INCENDIARY DEVICES—Personal possession, storage, or use of firecrackers, fireworks, fire bombs, smoke bombs, blasting caps, ammunition, or any other explosive or incendiary device is prohibited anywhere on the Wesleyan campus or while one is engaged in any university-connected activity. Ammunition for use in sporting activities must be stored in the Office of Public Safety.

                E.    WEAPONS—Personal possession or use of operable firearms, air guns, or other weapons is prohibited on the Wesleyan campus or while participating in university activities.

    10.     RECKLESS ENDANGERMENT—Creating condition(s) or an environment that endangers, or has the potential to endanger, other members of the community or property is prohibited. Failure to take reasonable constructive action to remedy such conditions may also constitute a violation.

    11.     PETS—Students who, because of a disability, seek approval for a support or assistance animal must request a reasonable accommodation through Disability Resources.  This is a formal process that requires appropriate supporting documentation.  A determination is then made regarding whether it is reasonable for the animal to be on campus.  Students must not bring the emotional support animal to campus until they have received approval from Disabilities Resources and Residential Life.  Any student who has an animal in residence prior to approval is subject to a fine and judicial action.  For polices regarding service animals, please contact Disabilities Resources.

    12.     DISRUPTIONS—The following “ground rules” for political freedom on  campus  are  excerpted  from  the  booklet “Academic Freedom and Civil Liberties of Students in College and University,” published by the American Civil Liberties Union in 1970.

    GROUND RULES—picketing, demonstrations, sit-ins, or student strikes, provided they are conducted in an orderly and non-obstructive manner, are a legitimate mode of expression, whether politically motivated or directed against the college administration, and should not be prohibited. Demonstrators, however, do not have the right to deprive others of the opportunity to speak or be heard, take hostages, physically obstruct the movement of others, or otherwise disrupt the educational or institutional processes in a way that interferes with the safety or freedom of others. Students should be free, and no special permission should be required, to distribute pamphlets or collect names for petitions concerned with campus or off-campus issues.

    Protests, sit-ins, demonstrations, student strikes, and other forms of expressions also violate the Code of Non- Academic Conduct when they:

    • Disrupt or obstruct curricular, co-curricular, or administrative/operational activities of  the University
    • Deny the rights of students, faculty, staff, or guests of the University
    • Inhibit others from moving freely on any part of the University campus, property owned or leased by the University, or to areas where they desire or need to pursue their goals
    • Disrupt the proper use of University offices or facilities
    • Endanger the safety of  any person on University property
    • Destroy or damage property
    • Violate statutory health and safety regulations
    •  

    See wesleyan.edu/studentaffairs/studenthandbook/standardsregulations/universitypolicies/disruptions.html, University Policies-Disruptions, for further clarification and guidelines.

    13.     DRUGS AND ALCOHOL— The University prohibits underage and unlawful possession, use, abuse, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol. This prohibition includes, but is not limited to, the following:

                A.    The possession, use, manufacture, distribution, or dispensing of illegal drugs or controlled substances by any member of the Wesleyan community. This includes the misuse or abuse of any medications prescribed by a physician to another individual. Students should be advised that university personnel may confiscate drug paraphernalia (including bongs, water pipes, etc.). Such items will be tested for drug residue and the owner held responsible for a drug policy violation if appropriate.

                B.    Underage possession or consumption of alcohol anywhere on university property or at university-sponsored events.

                C.    Distribution of alcohol to underage persons anywhere on university property or at university-sponsored events. Hosts of social events where alcohol is distributed may be held responsible for any such illegal distribution committed by their guests.

                D.    The possession of false identification.

                E.    Possession of open containers of alcohol is prohibited at all times and at all campus locations, except in private residential settings where the residents are of legal age or during registered events. In addition, the possession of an open container or consumption of alcohol on City property, streets, and sidewalks is prohibited by City ordinance.

    Note: Members of the Wesleyan community who are of legal drinking age may consume alcohol on Foss Hill during daylight hours.

                F.     The sale, distribution or dispensing of alcohol without a permit in any premises, building, apartment, or other place used by any club, association, social, or fraternal society or organization to the members thereof, their guests, or other persons.

                G.    Operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs.

    Note: Students requiring medical assistance as a result of alcohol and drug use will typically not face a formal judicial hearing if they agree to meet with Health Services staff following their hospitalization and participate in any recommended educational assignments.

    14.     FAILURE TO COMPLY—Members of the community are expected to comply with reasonable requests made by university personnel acting within the capacity of their responsibilities, including requests for adequate identification. Public Safety officers should be allowed to enter private residential spaces to address suspected policy violations. Officers may enter private residential spaces without residents’ permission only with the approval of the vice president for student affairs (or designee).

    15.     DEPARTMENT REGULATIONS—Members of the community are expected to abide by duly established and promulgated non-academic regulations. This is intended to cover the operating regulations of all university programs and facilities. These include, but are not limited to, the policies outlined later in this booklet and available at wesleyan.edu/studentaffairs/studenthandbook/standardsregulations/universitypolicies/

  • A. Composition and Tenure
    1. The voting membership of  the Graduate Community Standards Board (GCSB) shall consist of  seven graduate students, each serving a one-year term.
    2. The advisory membership of  the GCSB shall consist of  one faculty member, serving a two-year term, as well as the directors of  graduate student services and graduate studies, each serving ex officio.
  • B. Selection
    1. The voting membership of  the GCSB shall be selected from the registered MA and PhD seeking graduate students of the University.
    2. All voting members shall be selected to one full academic year, including both fall and spring semesters. Additional members may be selected to fill vacancies. Substitute members will serve for the duration of the unexpired term.
    3. Voting members shall be elected by the Graduate Student Association.
    4. A voting member of  the GCSB may be removed from the board, for cause, by the Graduate Council. Complaints against a voting member of  the GCSB should be submitted to the director of  graduate studies.
    5. A graduate student who is a GCSB member and is named as a respondent to a complaint may not serve on a hearing panel while that complaint is pending resolution.
    6. A graduate student found responsible for a violation of the honor code or code of non-academic may not serve as a member of the GCSB.
    7. A voting member of the GCSB may serve concurrently on the Graduate Council.
    8. The faculty advisors to the GCSB will be selected by the Graduate Council and will be expected to participate in GCSB training.
  • C. Officers
    1. The voting members shall select, with the approval of the director of graduate studies, one chair, normally serving a one-year term.
    2. The chair shall review complaints as they are received by the director of  graduate studies or the director of  graduate student services, consult with the administrative advisor(s) on the appropriate method of adjudication, and schedule judicial hearings as appropriate. The chair will maintain records in a form approved by the director of graduate student services.
  • D. Responsibilities
    1. The GCSB shall hear complaints concerning alleged violations of  the Code of  Non-Academic Conduct and/or the Honor Code by graduate students or by graduate student groups. When appropriate, the GCSB shall attempt to refer cases for mediation prior to any formal adjudication. Cases involving allegations of sexual assault may not be referred for mediation and will be adjudicated in accordance with the procedures outlined in the Discriminatory Harassment and Sexual Misconduct policy (http://www.wesleyan.edu/inclusion/misconduct/index.html).  In all cases, the GCSB shall determine the level of  individual and/or group responsibility for the incident leading to the complaint.
    2. The GCSB shall be responsible for primary adjudication of all alleged violations of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct and the Honor Code, except those cases that may arise when the GCSB cannot convene (summer, recess periods, etc.). Cases arising when the GCSB cannot convene may be held in abeyance until such time as the GCSB reconvenes, may be disposed of via judicial conference, or may be adjudicated by an interim administrative judicial board. 
    3. In order to permit the expeditious handling of  cases in which mediation is feasible or of  minor judicial matters, the GCSB may, with the approval of  the director of  graduate studies, develop simplified procedures and may delegate the responsibilities for mediation or adjudication.
    4. In judicial matters, the GCSB shall receive evidence, hear witnesses, determine if the reported graduate student(s) or group is responsible for violations of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct or the Honor Code, and shall recommend sanctions. In a formal sense, the authority to impose sanctions in the name of the University must be vested in an officer of the University. The board will forward its finding and recommended sanction(s) to the vice president for student affairs who will review and implement them in the name of the University. The considered judgment of the board shall be taken by the vice president for student affairs as a binding recommendation, to be modified only in extraordinary circumstances.
    5. The role of the faculty and administrative advisor(s) is to brief the GJB before each hearing to ensure a clear understanding of  the regulation(s) in question and of  the hearing procedures. The advisor(s) shall advise the chair during hearings to see that the board correctly follows procedures. They may offer information and assist the chair in facilitation. They may also offer advice or clarification regarding appropriate sanctions or questions regarding policies and procedures during deliberations in closed session.

Judicial Procedures

  • A. Student's Rights
    1. Written notice of charges, including time and place of the alleged violation, at least seventy-two (72) hours' prior to a GCSB hearing.
    2. Advice from the Office of Graduate Student Services in preparing for a hearing.
    3. Resolution of charges in accordance with judicial system policies as outlined.
    4. Review of the reports that serve as the basis for the charge(s).
    5. Participation in the hearing, if the case is not resolved via judicial conference.
    6. Assistance from a process advisor.
    7. Written notice of the hearing decision.
    8. File an appeal.
    9. Confidentiality regarding the outcome of their hearing (except for the complainant's right to be informed of the GJB’s hearing) and any subsequent appeal.
  • B. Reports of Violations
    Although some alleged violations are documented by the Office of Public Safety, any individual who is aware of a violation of the Code of  Non-Academic Conduct or the Honor Code may submit a report to the director of  graduate studies or the director of graduate student services. Reports should be submitted as soon as possible, but preferably within five (5) days of the incident. Reports must be in writing and contain a complete description of the incident with the names of all parties involved as participants or witnesses. The University may file a complaint when violations of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct harm salaried employees, university guests or neighbors, or if  witnesses are unwilling to pursue the matter.
    The Code of Non-Academic Conduct applies to groups as well as to individuals. Whenever a complaint is filed with the GCSB, the officers of  the GCSB and an administrative advisor will review the complaint to determine the degree to which a group may be responsible for the actions leading to the complaint. If it is determined that a group may be responsible for a violation of the Code, the GCSB will take appropriate action with respect to the group as well as the individuals involved.
  • C. Notification of Charges
    The respondent will receive written notification of  alleged violations of  the Code of  Non-Academic Conduct or the Honor Code. The respondent must respond to the notice of charges within the time frame outlined in the notification. The University’s primary means of communicating with graduate students is through their Wesleyan e-mail accounts. Graduate students are responsible for reading and responding to e-mail from university officials.
  • D. Adjudication Procedures

    There are several adjudication procedures used to resolve cases. The GCSB chair and administrative advisor(s) will meet to review cases submitted for adjudication. This group will determine the appropriate adjudication procedure for resolving the case. If the group is unable to come to consensus on an adjudication procedure for a particular case, the director of  graduate studies may make the final determination.

    1. JUDICIAL CONFERENCE

    Minor judicial matters and Non-Academic Conduct cases where mediation is feasible will be referred to the director of graduate student services who will contact the respondent(s) and attempt to resolve the case via a judicial conference. During the judicial conference, the respondent(s) and the director of graduate student services will discuss the incident, alleged violations, and possible sanctions. If an agreement regarding the student’s level of responsibility and sanctions (if appropriate) can be reached during the conference, the student will sign a summary/response form indicating their agreement with the proposed resolution and the case will be considered closed. If no agreement can be reached, the case will be referred to the Graduate Community Standards Board for formal adjudication.

    If a student is facing more serious charges, the student may request a judicial conference with the director of graduate studies or designee. The conference will be conducted as outlined above, but the full range of sanctions is available to the director. The director will consult the chair of  the GCSB before imposing sanctions.

    2. SIMPLIFIED GCSB HEARINGS

    In cases involving minor violations, the GCSB shall convene a simplified hearing. At such a hearing, the board shall meet with three voting members present. Although permitted, advisors do not normally attend simplified hearings. A limited range of sanctions including disciplinary warning, disciplinary probation, community service assignments, fines, restitution, and educational assignments is available in the procedure. If, during the course of a simplified hearing, the GCSB determines that the nature of the violation and/or probable sanctions are more serious than anticipated, the simplified hearing may be adjourned in favor of  a full hearing.

    3. FUll GCSB HEARINGS

    In cases involving violations that are deemed to be serious, the GCSB shall convene a full hearing. At such a hearing, the board shall meet with five voting members present, at least one faculty advisor, and the director of graduate studies. The full range of sanctions is available in this procedure. In cases where the administration identifies itself as the aggrieved party, the administrative advisor should withdraw and will be replaced by the second faculty advisor. This procedure should not be followed when the administration brings a case on behalf  of  an aggrieved third party.

    If a graduate student’s continued presence on campus endangers university property, the physical safety or well-being of other members of the university community, affects the individual’s physical or emotional safety or well- being, or disrupts the educational process of the community, the director of graduate studies may request an expedited  hearing.

    An expedited hearing will be convened immediately (typically within 48 hours) and may involve an interim board if the GCSB is unable to convene on such short notice. Examples of cases that warrant such a hearing include, but are not limited to, cases involving arson, assault, sexual misconduct, threats, and reckless endangerment. The director of graduate studies has the authority to place a student on an immediate suspension pending the outcome of the hearing.

    4. JOINT GRADUATE STUDENT-ADMINISTRATIVE PANEL

    When the GCSB chair and advisors determine that a case involves egregious violations and/or serious violations where external legal charges may also result from the alleged conduct, a joint student-administrative panel may be convened to hear the case. At such a hearing, the panel shall be comprised of two graduate student members of the GJB and two administrators, all with full voice and vote. At least one of the GJB’s administrative advisors should serve on the panel. The full range of sanctions is available in this procedure. If  the board is unable to come to a consensus on the case during deliberations, the director of graduate studies may make the final determination. The director of graduate studies may consult with the University’s legal advisor if  appropriate.

    5. JOINT GJB-SJB PANEL

    When the GJB chair determines that a case involves both an undergraduate(s) student(s) and a graduate student(s), a joint GCSB-CSB panel may be convened to hear the case. At such a hearing, the panel shall be comprised of two student members and one advisor member from each of the GCSB and CSB panels. A graduate student is defined as a student who has completed all bachelor’s degree requirements and received a four-year undergraduate degree.

    6. Interim Administrative Panel
    An interim administrative board shall be comprised of the director of graduate studies, the director of graduate student services, and at least one graduate student member of the GCSB. The director of graduate studies will consult with a designated representative from the GCSB in order to determine the manner in which cases should be resolved when the GCSB cannot convene.

  • E. Hearing Procedures

    1. The chair will conduct the hearing according to the following procedures:

    A. The chair will inform the respondent(s) of  the alleged violation(s).

    B. The respondent(s) will acknowledge whether they are responsible.

    C. The complainant(s) and witnesses (if  any) will have the opportunity to make opening statements and offer their account of the incident.

    D. The respondent(s) and their witnesses (if any) will have the opportunity to make opening statements and offer their account of the incident.

    E. The complainant(s) and the respondent(s) may question each other and any witnesses. Questions are directed to the board who then redirects them to the appropriate party.

    F. Board members may question the complainant(s), the respondent(s), and/or any witnesses.

    G. The complainant(s) and the respondent(s) may make closing statements.

    In cases where the complainant(s) or respondent(s) fail to appear, the chair may modify these procedures.

    2. All parties involved in the hearing may review available written evidence in the case file before the hearing.

    3. All judicial hearings shall be conducted in accordance with the standards of fair process. Specifically, the respondent should be informed of the nature of the charges, be given a fair opportunity to refute them, and the opportunity to appeal the board’s decision. Any board members who feel they cannot be impartial in a given case may recuse themselves, and shall be replaced by other voting members.

    4. The board may require the cooperation of any member of the university community in furnishing testimony or evidence directly related to the adjudication of a case. However, no member of the university staff with whom a respondent has entered into a statutorily recognized confidential relationship may provide information arising from that relationship with- out the permission of the respondent. Furthermore, the board shall excuse a witness if it concludes that by giving testimony the witness may be endangered.

    5. Only individuals with direct knowledge of the incident will be allowed as witnesses. Character witnesses are not permitted.

    6. The chair (or designee) will generate a written summary of all hearings. Full hearings may also be audio-recorded. Written summaries will be maintained with the case file. Audio recordings of the hearings are to be used by the board during deliberations and/or by the vice president for student affairs if there is an appeal of the board’s findings. Audio recordings will be destroyed after the appeal process is complete.

    7. Graduate student judicial records are confidential and are available only to persons who have permission from the student. Limited judicial information may be shared with other university administrators and faculty members who, at the discretion of  the director of  graduate studies have a legitimate need to know.

    8. All hearings are closed to the general public.

    9. If a respondent fails to appear for a scheduled hearing concerning alleged violations of the Code of Non-academic Conduct, the board will hear the case based on the available information. The University will not necessarily drop charges of misconduct because a respondent leaves the University for any reason (e.g., voluntary withdrawal, required resignation, separation, or dismissal).

    10. A respondent may bring an advisor to a hearing. The advisor must be a graduate student, a member of the faculty, or an administrator at the University. During the hearing, the advisor may only advise during recesses granted by the board and may clarify procedural questions before, during, or after the hearing.

    11. The board will make decisions about responsibility and sanction(s), if appropriate, during closed session, and their decisions regarding responsibility shall be based on the evidential standard of “fair preponderance.” The board is responsible for determining if it is more likely than not that the alleged violation occurred. The party bringing the charges need not provide evidence beyond a reasonable doubt in a hearing. Decisions rendered during hearings shall be by majority vote of  the voting members present. The board will forward its finding and recommended sanction(s) to the director of graduate studies who will review and implement them in the name of the University. The considered judgment of the board shall be taken by the director of graduate studies as a binding recommendation, to be modified only in extraordinary circumstances.

    12. The University requires that judicial boards and administrative staff maintain confidentiality regarding judicial matters. Individual(s) who reported the alleged violation(s) will be informed of the board’s decision. Information about assigned sanctions will be shared with reporting parties as deemed appropriate by the board.

    The director of graduate studies and the director of graduate student services may share information about judicial charges, findings, and sanctions with university personnel who, at the discretion of the director of graduate studies and the director of  graduate student services, have a legitimate need to know.

  • F. Hearing Findings

    1. NOT RESPONSIBLE

    A decision that the respondent is not responsible for a violation of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct nor the Honor Code, or that there is insufficient evidence to establish that a student is responsible for the alleged violation(s).

    2. RESPONSIBLE

    A decision that the respondent is responsible for a violation of policy as charged. A finding of violation of the Honor Code shall require the unanimous vote of  the board.

  • G. Hearing Sanctions

    1. In cases of violation of  the Honor Code, the board shall invoke such sanctions as it sees fit. The board will forward its finding and recommended sanction(s) to the vice president for student affairs who will review and implement them in the name of the University. The considered judgment of the board shall be taken by the vice president for student affairs as a binding recommendation, to be modified only in extraordinary circumstances. When sanctions entail changes in grades, the faculty member(s) involved is(are) required to implement the decision of the GCSB.

    2. The board will consider a range of sanctions of graduated severity to deal with infractions of varying seriousness including but not limited to community service, fines, restitution, educational assignments, and referrals to other university administrators. Based on the findings, the board will normally recommend the imposition of  one of  the following sanctions:

    A. DISCIPLINARY WARNING: An official written reprimand that includes a warning that further violations of the Code of  Non-Academic Conduct or the Honor Code will result in more serious sanctions.

    B. DISCIPLINARY PROBATION: A temporary status for a period to be established by the board, during which the graduate student’s standing within the University is in question. Additional violations during the probationary period may result in suspension or dismissal.

    C. DEFERRED SUSPENSION: A status imposed by the board, indicating the graduate student’s standing within the University is in jeopardy. Additional violations during the probationary period will result in suspension or dismissal.

    D. SUSPENSION: A graduate student’s removal from the institution for a period to be determined by the judiciary, but in no event less than the remaining portion of the semester during which the case is adjudicated. Graduate students must comply with the terms of  their suspension in order to be eligible to return to the University.

    E. DISMISSAL: A graduate student’s permanent removal from the institution.

    3. In cases of damage to university property, the board, as a part of its recommendation to the director of graduate studies, should normally require full restitution and/or any reasonable expenses for repair. The board may recommend restitution for damages suffered by a third party, but cannot collect damages on behalf  of  a third party.

    4. The board may recommend restriction of individual access to specific university facilities, limitation of individual participation in specific university activities, or curtailment of privileges that are enjoyed by a student, so long as these restrictions are directly relevant to the violation.

    5. REPEAT VIOLATIONS: In the case of repeated violations or violation in deliberate disregard of a specific warning, a student will be subject to more serious sanctions than would otherwise be the case. A prior disciplinary record is never relevant in determining the facts of an incident, but once the facts have been established, it is relevant in determining appropriate sanctions.

    6. SANCTIONS RELATED TO GROUP BEHAVIOR: In addition to recommending other sanctions such as community service, fines, educational assignments, restitution, etc., the board may recommend the imposition of  the following sanctions:

    A. A written disciplinary warning with a copy maintained in the judicial file. The warning may specify corrective measures that can help the group avoid similar complaints in the future.

    B. Disciplinary probation for a period to be established by the board, implying that the group’s standing within the University is in jeopardy and that further negligent or willful violations will normally result in suspension of university recognition or affiliation. Disciplinary probation may include restrictions on the group’s functions during the probationary period. The group should also be informed of corrective measures that must be undertaken during the probationary period and maintained after its conclusion.

    C. SUSPENSION OF UNIVERSITY RECOGNITION: a group desiring to reestablish a relationship with the University must reapply for recognition or affiliation by the University through the director of graduate studies.

  • H. Appeals

    Appeals of  judicial findings may be directed to the vice president for student affairs (VPSA) who will convene an Appeals Board. The board shall consist of the VPSA as chairperson, one faculty member, and one student member. The faculty member shall be a member of the Faculty Committee on Rights and Responsibilities. The VPSA will select a student member from the membership of the Graduate Community Standards Board, on a case by case basis. Appeals Board members will not have been involved in the adjudication of the case being appealed. 

    The purpose of the Appeals Board is to ensure that hearings were conducted according to the established judicial procedures. The Appeals Board will not substitute its own judgment for that of the original hearing body. Respondents who have been found to be in violation may appeal the decision to the Appeals Board on the basis of the following grounds:

    1. Violation of fair process;

    2. New evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of the hearing;

    3. Procedural error (if the error adversely affected the outcome of the hearing).

    Students who wish to appeal must do so in writing. The appeal letter must clearly state the grounds and rationale for the appeal. Appeal letters should be addressed to the VPSA and must be submitted within five business days of the hearing decision.

    Sanctions resulting from the case will not typically be implemented until after the appeal is resolved. If an expedited full hearing results in a student’s immediate suspension or dismissal, the student must leave campus and remain off campus during the appeal process.

    The VPSA will notify the student of the outcome of the appeal. If the appeal is granted, the Appeals Board has the authority to recommend a new hearing before a new board/panel. If the appeal is denied, the sanctions will be imposed and the University will consider the case closed.

  • I. Additional Procedures

    1. INTERNAL INJUNCTIONS

    One special power, which may be exercised by the GCSB, shall be to determine the point at which free expression by one individual or group crosses the line of  tolerability and becomes an invasion of  the rights of  other individuals.  This critical judgment must always be exercised in determining when verbal or physical expression can reasonably be considered harassment or disruption. Immediately upon receipt of a complaint that harassment or disruption is in process or imminent, thereby threatening to deprive an individual of their rights, the GCSB shall convene to consider the matter. In such a case, the board shall be authorized to deliver an injunction against the conduct in question. This warning shall contain an explicit description of the disruptive behavior and a reasonable time limit for compliance with the terms of the injunction. The injunction shall remain in effect until superseded by the decision of the VPSA. If the injunction is violated, the director of graduate studies (or designee) shall have the authority to impose immediate, temporary sanctions including, but not limited to, immediate suspension from the University.

    2. REVISIONS

    The president has the authority to make changes to the Code of Non-Academic Conduct, the Honor Code, or related procedures. Changes should be proposed to the director of graduate studies. The director of graduate studies will consult with the members of the GCSB and with the Graduate Council about the proposed changes before forwarding recommendations to the president. If extensive changes appear warranted, the Graduate Council should consider establishment of  a mechanism for broadly eliciting opinion and advice from the community.

    3. JUDICIAL RECORDS

    Graduate student judicial records are confidential and are maintained separately from official academic records. Judicial records are maintained for six years after the academic year in which the violation was adjudicated. To inspect their record, a graduate student should make an appointment with the director of graduate student services. Graduate students will have access to all official records and correspondence in the file. Except as required by law, information from the file cannot be released without the graduate student’s permission.

Graduate Judicial Board Members

Voting Membership shall consist of five grad students, each serving a one year term. Advisory Membership is made up of one faculty member serving a two-year term, and the Director of Graduate Studies and the Director of Graduate Student Services each serving ex officio.
  • 2016-17

    Graduate Student Members

    Nickesha Anderson, Biology PhD  

    Miles DeAngelis, Biology, PhD                                              

    Jacob Fanthorpe, Physics PhD  

    Yoana Gendzhova, Chemistry PhD                      

    Katie Kaus, MB&B PhD

                                  

    Faculty and Administrative Advisors

    Constance Leidy                Professor of Mathematics

    Ann C. Burke                     Director of Graduate Studies and Professor of Biology     

    Cheryl-Ann Hagner             Director of Graduate Student Services

Graduate Judicial Board Process Advisors

When charges are filed against a student, there are several possible options for disposing of the case. For some students, the entire process of appearing before the Graduate Judicial Board (GJB) can be upsetting and somewhat confusing. Process advisors have been trained on Wesleyan's peer-based judicial system, and are available as advisors to students who have had charges filed against them. Process advisors will not function as "legal counsel" for the student, but will serve as informational resources as the student navigates the system.

Case Summaries

  • 2016-17
    • The Board was asked to review a possible violation of Section II, Regulations 13C and 14 (Distribution of alcohol to underage persons on university property and Failure to Comply) of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct.  This case was resolved via Judicial Conference.  The student was found responsible and received a disciplinary warning.
  • 2015-16
    • The Board was asked to review a possible violation of Section II, Regulation I, (Disturbance of the Peace) of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct.  A Full Judicial Panel heard the case.  The Board found four students responsible.  Three students received a sanction of Disciplinary Probation through the end of the Spring 2016 semester.  One student received a sanction of Disciplinary Warning.  The four students were asked to write a letter of apology to the Middletown neighbor who reported the incident.
  • 2014-15
    • The Board was asked to review a possible violation of Section II, Regulation 4 (Property) of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct.  A Simplified Judicial Panel heard the case. The Board found two students responsible.  This was the first offense for one student and the Board recommended a Disciplinary Warning.  This was the second offense for one student and the Board recommended Disciplinary Probation through the end of the fall 2015 term.
    • The Board was asked to review a possible violation of Section II, Regulation 11 (Pets) of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct.  A Simplified Judicial Panel heard the case.  The Board found the student responsible and recommended Disciplinary Probation until the student graduates.
    • The Board was asked to review a possible violation of Section B #2 of the Honor Code – Plagiarism.  A full Judicial Panel heard the case.  The Board found the student responsible and recommended Disciplinary Probation through May 31. 2016.
  • 2013-14

    • The Board was asked to review a possible violation of a No-Contact Agreement.  An Administrative Panel heard the case.  During the hearing, the student admitted responsibility for violating the agreement.  The Board found the student responsible and recommended disciplinary probation and an appointment with CAPS.
    • The Board was asked to review a possible violation of Subsection 2 of the Honor Code (Plagiarism). A Full Judicial Panel heard the case.  The Board found the student responsible and recommended expulsion from the university. The student appealed the decision of the Board to the President of the university.  The appeal was denied.
  • 2012-13
    • The Board was asked to review a possible violation of Section II, Regulation 4 (Property) of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct.  A Simplified Judicial Panel heard the case. The Board found the student responsible and recommended a Disciplinary Warning. 

    • The Board was asked to review possible violations of Section II, Regulations 1 (Disturbance of the Peace) and 4 (Property) of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct. A Full Judicial Panel heard the case.  The Board found the student responsible for violating Section 4 and recommended disciplinary warning and removal from family housing.  The student appealed the decision of the Board to the President of the university.  The appeal was denied.
    • The Board was asked to review a possible violation of Section II, Regulation 1 (Disturbance of the Peace) of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct.  A Simplified Judicial Panel heard the case.  The Board found the student responsible and recommended Disciplinary Warning.
  • 2011-12
    • The Board was asked to review a possible violation of Section II, Regulation(s) A 2 of the Code of Non-Academic Conduct: Harassment and Abuse.  A joint Graduate Student Administrative Panel heard the case. The student was found responsible for violating the code and sanctioned to Disciplinary probation, an appointment with CAPS, and 30 hours of community service. The student appealed the decision to the President of the university.  The appeal was denied.

Honor Code and Code of Non-Academic Conduct

Honor Code and Code of Non-Academic Conduct