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About the Minor

The the Education studies minor is designed to help students look critically at educational institutions, practices, and thinking in the United States and abroad—from the elementary to the university level. The majority of the courses required for the minor focus on the psychological and sociological dimensions of education. Courses from other parts of the university focus on the tools and skills for analyzing education and on broader contexts within the history and philosophy of knowledge. Another category of courses provides students with concrete teaching experience in a variety of instructional settings. The goal is to help students acquire a deeper understanding of education and its relationship to society.

The minor does not provide the course credentials for CT State Initial Educator Certification that are required for teaching positions in public schools. Visit Alternate Route to Certification for more information.

Supervising Faculty

Steven E. Stemler

Associate Professor of Psychology

Anna Shusterman

Associate Professor of Psychology

Admission to the Minor

Students are strongly urged to consult with one of the supervising faculty as they develop their plans for fulfilling the requirements.

Declare the minor through the Major/Minor/Certificate Declaration link via WesPortal>Academics>Major/Minor/Certificate Declaration. It is best to do this as early as possible so that you can receive e-mails and updates about the minor from the supervising faculty who will help you with academic planning. 

Minor Requirements

The Education studies minor is awarded to students who complete seven courses from an approved curriculum. Successful candidates must earn either a grade of B or better in each course or maintain a B+ or better average for the seven courses used for the minor. The courses must include at least one course in each of the following categories:

  1. Cognitive and psychological influences on learning and schooling
  2. Social and structural analyses of education
  3. Statistics - The field of education research is replete with quantitative data that can inform theory and practice. Furthermore, there is a push to make educational decisions “data-driven.” To participate in these central conversations, students need to have a grasp of basic statistical principles.
  4. Broader contexts - To put the contemporary U.S. educational system into context, students should take a course that addresses how systems of knowledge are understood, constructed, transmitted, and changed. A broad theoretical course should sharpen students’ ideas about what is taught, why it is taught, and how it is taught in the current U.S. context.
  5. In-school experience

The two additional courses should be chosen from those listed in categories 1 and/or 2.  The courses may be completed in any order consistent with their prerequisites.

The supervising faculty maintains a suggested course list below. Students may contact one of the minor’s supervising faculty to discuss other courses that might fulfill the requirements.

The Category 5 in-school experience requirement does not need to be credit-bearing. If the experience is something other than one of the listed courses below, the experience must be fully documented and fully meet the Category 5 criteria. Contact one of the supervising faculty to discuss how to document fulfilling this category.

For a detailed list of courses that fulfill each cateogory within the minor, click here.

Link to WesMaps Courses

The Certificate in the Study of Education is designed to help students look critically at educational institutions, practices, and thinking in the United States and abroad—from the elementary to the university level. The majority of the courses required for the certificate focus on the psychological and sociological dimensions of education. Courses from other parts of the University focus on the tools and skills for analyzing education and on broader contexts within the history and philosophy of knowledge. Another category of courses provides students with concrete teaching experience in a variety of instructional settings. The goal is to help students acquire a deeper understanding of education and its relationship to society.

The Certificate in the Study of Education does not provide the course credentials for Connecticut State Initial Educator Certification that are required for teaching positions in public schools.